NTA's iPad Grant

Below is the grant that we wrote and won from the CPS Office of Information Technology Services to receive 32 iPads for the classroom!


Project Title: Everyday Math with Everyday Technology

(& iPad integration in other subjects too!)

Project Leaders: Jennifer Cho Magiera

Project Grade Levels: 4th and 5th Grades

Project Subject Matter: Math (as well as Literacy, Social Science and Science)

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1.    Project Description

a. Goals: The teacher will more efficiently collect and utilize data in lesson planning and execution. The rigor of the curriculum will be enhanced through higher order thinking skills, problem solving and group work. Collegial collaboration will be increased through shared use of the iPads and e-portfolios.

            b. Proposed Grade Levels: 4th and 5th grades (Including special education resource students)

c. Activities: We will follow the CPS Office of Math and Science curriculum, Everyday Mathematics and follow the CMSI disseminated Guide to Pacing and Standardized Assessment (GPSA) as our timeline. Each day, we will teach math in a 75 minute block, following the outline below:

 

 

Everyday Math Block Segment

Group Size

Part I

Mental Math & Reflexes

Students will use the iPad as a mini whiteboard / slate to record their answers to quick math problems solved mentally. The teacher can either get their answers emailed to him/her or can use a projector to display work (their answers will be used as formative assessment). In both cases, the iPad PenUltimate Application will be utilized.

Whole class

(30-32 – math will be taught on a staggered schedule so that Part I will not happen at the same time in each room. This way all of the school’s iPads can be used at once during this session.)

Math Message (Activating Prior Knowledge)

Students will use the iPad PenUltimate Application to respond to math problems designed to activate prior knowledge related to the upcoming lesson. The Math Messages are already uploaded electronically onto the Everyday Math website on CMSI, so teacher will simply send the students’ iPads the message and all they need to do is respond with text and drawings. Students work can then be shared electronically or using a projector. All student responses can be saved throughout the year for future reference and to maintain as part of the e-Portfolio.

Whole class

(30-32 – math will be taught on a staggered schedule so that Part I will not happen at the same time in each room. This way all of the school’s iPads can be used at once during this session.)

Lesson

In some lessons, the iPad can be utilized as a math tool:

Ø  Geometer’s Sketchpad Application

Ø  Maps of the US Application and National Geographic World Atlas HD Application for the World Tour-4th grade/American Tour-5th grade lessons

Ø  National Library of Virtual Manipulatives from Utah State University

Ø  Numbers Application for Data in 4th Grade Unit 2/5th Grade Unit 6

In all lessons, the iPad will be used as a tool to take formative data using Everyday Math’s daily “Recognizing Student Achievement” problem. We will use the E-Clicker Application to poll the class on the RSA problem, then discuss the results as a class (also reinforcing data usage – discussing student responses in terms of maximum, minimum, mode, median, range as well as viewing bar graphs, line graphs, etc of their answers).

Whole class / small groups

(30-32 – math will be taught on a staggered schedule so that Part I will not happen at the same time in each room. This way all of the school’s iPads can be used at once during this session.)

Part II

Math Boxes (Spiraling Review of covered material)

Students can use the E-Clicker Application to inform the teacher of what problems they need more help with.

Small group centers: 10 students

(Flexible grouping based on the RSA from the lesson)

Games (Spiraling Review of covered material)

Students can play online math games (that do not require Adobe Flash Player) correlated with Everyday Math games and IL State, as well as Common Core Standards.

Small group centers: 10 students

(Flexible grouping based on the RSA from the lesson)

Part III

Differentiation

Students will visit differentiated centers in which they can engage in problem solving activities utilizing the iPads such as: interacting on an

 Extended Response Math Blog, Mind Institute games, Unit Math Projects from the Everyday Math program, Study Island standardized test preparation website

Small group centers: 10 students

(Flexible grouping based on the RSA from the lesson)

 

Additional plans of how the iPad will be integrated daily, in addition to the Everyday Math with Everyday Technology block:

- Morning Meeting:

Students will engage in a short lesson reflecting on social-emotional objectives (anti-bullying, self-confidence, decision making, etc.) and take turns posting comments on a blog to which students can reply during anchor activity time (at the end of other subjects). Students who have problems in the classroom can also use the blog to get support anonymously from their classmates.

- Literacy / Social Science Integration:

Students will read high interest novels integrated with the Social Science, Science and Social Emotional curricula and engage in online virtual Literature Circles to discuss, analyze and interact with the texts. Students will also use the Library of Congress website to read historical documents and practice interacting with primary source documents (to not only improve Literacy but Social Science skills as well). Students will also use the EPals in2books© Penpal Program to further explore and discuss their books.

- Science Integration: Students can use the FOSS website as well as the BrainPOP Application to further their science skills. They can also collect and analyze data using the Numbers Application.

2.  Alignment to Standards

With the use of the iPads, all Illinois Learning Standards for Math and several for English Language Arts and Social Sciences will all be addressed.  This is possible through the various ways the iPad will be routinely used to enhance each of the three parts of the Everyday Math Curriculum as outlined above.  As part of an everyday routine, the teacher is able to change the content while still engaging students in problem solving and collaboration.

To ensure alignment to Illinois Learning Standards for Math, we will follow the CMSI disseminated Guide to Pacing and Standardized Assessment (GPSA) which is designed to help teachers plan and pace instruction. It outlines the Illinois Learning Standards for Mathematics that are addressed in each lesson, and it includes notes to help you prepare students for testing. (See http://cmsi.cps.k12.il.us/ViewNewsDetails.aspx?pid=1000&id=13758 for further details.)

In addition to the ILS for Math, we will also address the following Reading and Social Science standards through integration of reading the electronic Student Reference Book (in PDF) for mathematics in shared reading as well as the iPad Maps Apps for the EM Tour lessons:

>>English Language Arts:

1.B.2a  Establish purposes for reading; survey materials; ask questions; make predictions; connect, clarify and extend ideas.

1.B.2c  Continuously check and clarify for understanding (e.g., in addition to previous skills, clarify terminology, seek additional information).

1.B.2d  Read age-appropriate material aloud with fluency and accuracy.

1.C.2c  Compare and contrast the content and organization of selections.

1.C.2f  Connect information presented in tables, maps and charts to printed or electronic text.

>>Social Science:

17.A.2b  Use maps and other geographic representations and instruments to gather information about people, places and environments.

In addition to addressing these Illinois Learning Standards, the everyday use of the iPads allows the teacher to use routines that meet the Illinois Applications of Learning Standards:

Communicating

Express and interpret information and ideas.

Using Technology

Use appropriate instruments, electronic equipment, computers and networks to access information, process ideas and communicate results.

Working on Teams

Learn and contribute productively as individuals and as members of groups.

Making Connections

Recognize and apply connections of important information and ideas within and among learning areas.

 

Below is a description of how the daily use of the iPads would demonstrate the Illinois Applications of Learning Standards.

 

Everyday Math Block Segment

Application of Learning

Part I

Mental Math & Reflexes

Communicating – Students are communicating their answers through the PenUltimate Application.

Using Technology – Students are using the iPad to communicate their answers and share their work w/ class.

Math Message

 

Making Connections – Students are connecting their prior knowledge to the new information that will be learned in the day’s lesson.

Communicating – Students are communicating their answers in text and/or drawings through the PenUltimate Application.

Using Technology - Students are using the iPad to communicate their answers and share their work with the class.  Students are also using the iPad to save their work to an e-portfolio.

Lesson

 

Communicating - Students will use the E-Clicker Application to communicate their RSA problem. Then the results are discussed in class.

Using Technology – Students are using the iPad to communicate their answers and share their work with the class.  Students are also using applications to enhance the day’s lesson.

Working on Teams – Students have opportunities to work in small groups or in partnerships to complete assignments and use iPad applications.

Making Connections – Students are able to use iPad applications that connect content areas such as Maps of the US Application and National Geographic World Atlas HD Application.

Part II

Math Boxes

Communication – Students use the E-Clicker Application to communicate to the teacher the problems that are difficult.

Using Technology – Students are using the iPad to communicate with the teacher and get feedback.

Games

 

Using Technology – Students play Everyday Math Games on their iPads.

Making Connections – Students play Everyday Math Games to practice their skills from the lesson.  Students are making connections between the content presented by the teacher and a different way to apply this knowledge in a game or activity.

Part III

Differentiation

 

Using Technology – Students use the iPads during problem solving activities like interacting on an Extended Response Math Blog, Mind Institute games, Unit Math Projects from the Everyday Math program, and Study Island standardized test preparation website.

Communicating – Students use the class math blog to communicate their ideas about an extended response problem.  They are also able to comment on their classmates’ ideas.

Working on Teams – Students collaborate through the Extended Response Math Blog, Unit Math Projects, and Teacher Table.

Making Connections – Students make connections by applying their math knowledge through the Math Blog, Mind Institute games, and Study Island Website.  Students make cross-curricular connections through the Unit Math Projects.

3.  Assessment/Evaluation Plan

 

Assessment of Student Progress

Student Assessment

Frequency

Objective

Use of iPad

NWEA - NWEA Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) tests present students with engaging, age-appropriate content. As a student responds to questions, the test responds to the student, adjusting up or down in difficulty. This test is given at our school in place of the CPS Benchmark Assessments.

Fall,

Winter,

Spring

Summative and Formative -

Data will be used to determine whole class groupings in a departmental setting

- Students can take the NWEA on the iPad.

- Teachers can collect, store and analyze data on the iPad and have student conferences regarding their progress.

Recognizing Student Achievement (RSA) – A daily check written into the Everyday Math curriculum designed to test student knowledge of the day’s goals.

Daily

Formative -

Data will be used to determine in class groupings for differentiated centers

- Students can use the E-Clicker Application to respond to RSA prompts and the teacher will display response data on the projector.

Unit Assessments – An end-of-unit test designed to assess student master of unit goals.

Every

2-3 weeks

Summative and Formative -

Data will be used to determine mastery of the content and whether re-teaching is required

- Teacher will collect, store and analyze student data on the iPad and have student conference regarding their progress.

Study Island – An online study tool used to engage students in IL State standardized test preparation through quizzes and games.

Weekly

Formative -

Data will be used to determine students’ retention of the material

- Students can log on to Study Island using the iPads.

- Teacher can track students’ Study Island scores per topic.

ISAT

Yearly

Summative -

Data will be used to determine students’ mastery of Illinois State Standards

- Students will maintain e-Portfolios and the ISAT scores can be uploaded into this document file.

Math Extended Response

Weekly

Formative -

Data will be used to identify students’ problem solving abilities

- Students can keep an e-portfolio of all Extended Responses completed throughout the year.

- The teacher can score the responses and send back electronic feedback.

Mental Math – A quick routine designed as part of the Everyday Math curriculum, in which students quickly write down answers to problems without writing their work.

Daily

Formative -

Data will be used to assess students’ recall and automaticity of math facts

- Students will self-assess based on their responses to the prompt given (using the iPad as a digital slate).

 

Professional Assessment of Technology Integration

CATEGORY

Poor - 1 pt

Fair - 2 pts

Good - 3 pts

Excellent - 4 pts

Frequency of use

iPads are used less than 2 times a week in math, as well as other subjects.

iPads are used 2-4 times a week in math, as well as other subjects.

iPads are used daily in math only.

iPads are used daily in math, as well as other subjects.

Collaboration

Teachers do not meet to discuss use of the iPads and student work surround their use.

Teachers meet bi-weekly to discuss use of the iPads and student work surround their use.

Only classroom teachers meet weekly to discuss use of the iPads and student work surround their use.

Classroom, special education and Arts and Sciences teachers (Music, Gym, Library) meet weekly to discuss use of the iPads and student work surround their use.

Feedback to Students

Students do not receive feedback.

Students receive feedback (conferencing, digital feedback/comments, online self-assessments, etc.) less than once a week.

Students receive feedback (conferencing, digital feedback/comments, online self-assessments, etc.) only once a week.

Students receive feedback (conferencing, digital feedback/comments, online self-assessments, etc.) at least twice a week

Student Progress

Students make less than a 5% gain on their NWEA RIT Score.

Students make a 5% gain on their NWEA RIT Score.

Students make a 6-9% gain on their NWEA RIT Score.

Students make at least a 10% gain on their NWEA RIT Score.

 

4.  Collaboration & Dissemination of Project to Colleagues

National Teachers Academy is a professional development school as well as a teacher-training academy in the Academy for Urban School Leadership (AUSL) Network. As a dual mission school, we aim to not only serve the neighborhood’s children but also disseminate best practice strategies, curriculum and reflective teaching practices to practicing and future teachers. If we were to receive the iPad technology grant, we would not only be able to share the technology learning and our experience with our school’s onsite faculty and staff, but also with the teacher-residents who learn at in out classrooms all year and additionally the teachers at the 17 other AUSL network schools through network meetings and curriculum work.

Currently, we meet weekly as a grade level team to discuss student work and teaching strategies. If we were to receive this grant, we would meet 2-3 times a week to continue the above, but also discuss our technology integration and schedules for sharing the materials (ie, how to pass them from room to room, how and when to charge the iPads, use of the projector, student assignments for each iPad, student expectations and routines for handling the iPads).

 Each meeting will have a specified agenda and meeting notes with “next steps.” The meetings agendas will include not only “bookkeeping” items (such as the material routines listed above), but also identify points on the rubric above to evaluate our technology integration. Additionally, we will analyze student assessments from the assessment chart above to reflect on our use of the technology and our instruction and consider if anything needs to be adjusted to better serve the students and utilize the iPads.

Additionally, we will request a slot during a PD day towards the end of the year to present our work and findings with the school. At this point, we will describe our experience, successes and failures utilizing anecdotal records, student work samples and data. Additionally we will be constantly sharing our practices with our in-room residents and their cohort of teacher-learners to pass on as they enter turn-around schools next year. All rubrics created, assessment templates, graphic organizers, routine protocols, etc will be shared and evaluated in whole and small groups with our cycles, residents, school and network.

Finally, both teachers working on this project are Office of Math and Science / CMSI Everyday Mathematics Professional Development Leaders as well as participants in writing work groups with the University of Chicago’s Everyday Math authors. We plan to also share our work with both of those offices and discuss our ways of implementing iPad technology in an Everyday Math classroom.

Our grade level, school and network all put a high priority and emphatic focus on our professional learning community. We are constantly discussing, reflecting on and evaluating our practices and students’ progress. The iPad grant will give our community another branch on which to grow and help us to become better educators in the 21st century.

 

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